STRATEGIC PLAN

  

 

 

STRATEGICPLAN

 

 

2015-2020

 

 

 

NYANCHWA BOYS HIGH SCHOOL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NYANCHWA BOYS HIGH SCHOOL

STRATEGIC PLAN

2015 - 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

@ All rights reserved, Nyanchwa Boys High School, 2015

info@nyanchwaboyshighschool.co.ke 

www.nyanchwaboyshighschool.co.ke 

P.o Box 951 – 40200

Kisii 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS

 

PESTEL                    Political, Economic, Socio - Cultural, Technological, Environmental and Legal Factors

SWOT                        Strengths, Weaknesses, opportunities and Threats

MSS                            Mean Standard Score

SP                               Strategic Plan

MOE                           Ministry of education

NGO                           Non Governmental Organization

BOG                           Board of Governors

HODs                          Heads of Departments

TSC                            Teachers Service Commission

PTA                            Parents Teacher Association

KNEC                                    Kenya National examination Council

DEB                            District Education Board

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS. 4

TABLE OF CONTENTS. 5

FOREWORD.. 6

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.. 9

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION.. 10

1.1        Historical profile of Nyanchwa Boys High School. 10

1.2 Previous school management. 11

1.3 School entry and performance in the last five years. 11

1.4        The Rationale of the Strategic Plan. 12

1.5        Education reforms. 13

1.6        Mandate of Nyanchwa Boys High School 14

1.6        Core functions of Nyanchwa Boys High School 14

1.7        Non – Core/Support functions of Nyanchwa Boys High School 15

1.8        Challenges of Nyanchwa Boys High School in implementing the strategic plan. 15

CHAPTER TWO: ENVIRONMENTAL SCANNING.. 16

2.1     Overview.. 16

2.2        SWOT Analysis. 16

2.3        PESTEL Analysis. 18

2.4 Stakeholder Analysis. 23

2.5 Institutional Capacity. 28

CHAPTER THREE: STRATEGIC DIRECTION.. 29

3.1 Mandate Vision, Mission and Core Values. 29

3.2 Strategic Issues. 30

3.3 Key result areas to be pursued in the strategy period. 31

3.4 Strategies and Activities. 32

CHAPTER FOUR: STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES/KEY RESULT AREAS. 34

4.1        Overview.. 34

4.2        Estimated Costs for implementing the Strategic Objectives of the 2013 – 2017 Strategic plan   34

CHAPTER FIVE: MONITORING AND EVALAUATION.. 49

5.1 Introduction. 49

5.2 Evaluation Mechanism.. 49

5.3. Plan Monitoring and Evaluation Framework. 50

CHAPTER SIX: FINANCING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF STRATEGIC PLAN.. 51

6.0. Introduction. 51

6.1 Cost Optimization. 51

6.2 Government Funding. 52

6.3 Constituency Development Fund (CDF). 52

6.4 LATTIF/Governor’s office education Committee. 52

6.5 National ST&I Fund. 52

6.6 Venture Capital 52

6.7 Donors (Development Partners). 52

6.8 Risk and Mitigation factors. 53

CHAPTER SEVEN: STRATEGIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION.. 54

7.1 The Implementation Approach. 54

7.2 Phasing and Sequencing. 54

7.3 Quick Wins. 54

7.4 Plan Performance Management 54

CHAPTER EIGHT: RISK OF IMPLEMENTING THE STRATEGIC PLAN.. 55

8.1 Introduction. 55

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FOREWORD

Nyanchwa Boys High School has made significant achievements since its establishment. The strategic plan 2015-2020 is the first document on the strategic direction the School will take in the next 5 years and our hope is that the strategic plan will provide direction and guidance to the schools becoming the best school in Kisii County, Kenya and Africa.  I sincerely believe that this plan lays the foundation to development of organizational values and characteristics that will define the culture therefore increasing our value and position as a school.

The 2015-2020 strategic plan, lays emphasis on increasing the MSS to 8 plus, school enrollment, excellence in co – curricular activities, innovation, student focus, Quality and Lean concepts of management as the main drivers of the school.  The plan will require constant updates and reviews to reflect the ever changing environmental and technological changes.

This strategic plan (2015-2020) provides a framework within which both strategic and operational decisions will be taken and forms the basis for planning school development, resource mobilization and monitoring and evaluation of the school’s development activities and programs. In very broad terms, this strategic plan focuses on two key issues/ areas.

  • Programs, activities and resources that will improve the school’s performance and development to required standards to make it competitive nationally and globally.
  • School improvement / development in terms of infrastructure, facilities and resources required for the school’s growth.

However there are also support areas for the performance of the school. These key support areas include:

  • School management and administration
  • Spiritual wellbeing, psychosocial support and wellbeing of Nyanchwa Boys High school.
  • Environmental conservation and management within the school management mandate.

In order to give a chance to key stakeholders to give their input in the development and progress required for the school’s growth, the B.O.G and P.T.A committees are charged with the responsibility of providing guidance and setting the pace in progress required in the two areas of focus.The strategic plan is also a guide to stakeholders of the school in making strategic choices and decisions to support and work with Nyanchwa Boys High school.

This school’s strategic plan was developed in tandem with Kenya’s vision 2030, the global Millennium development goals and Ministry of Education strategic plan. Following the successful implementation of the ERSWEC in Kenya, the Government through a consultative process has therefore developed the ―The Kenya Vision 2030 to guide the country‘s development in the long-term. The Vision will be implemented through three pillars namely economic, social and political. The economic pillar seeks to achieve an average economic growth rate of 10% per annum and sustaining the same till 2030 in order to generate resources for meeting sustainable development goals and the Kenyan Vision goals. The social pillar aims to create a just, cohesive and equitable social development in a clean and secure environment. The political pillar seeks to realize an issue-based, people-centered, results-oriented and accountable democratic system. It is the intention of this strategic plan to produce students who will be fundamental in helping the country achieve vision 2030 targets and more specifically the three pillars mentioned above

Finally, the strategic plan (SP)addresses issues of sustainability, competitiveness and seeks to develop a niche for Nyanchwa Boys High school in the provision of quality education and discipline in a rapidly changing social –economic society.

 

 

Mr. Atuti Timothy

Principal, Nyanchwa Boys High School

 


 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The development of this 2015 - 2020 Strategic Plan will enable the School to align its mandate, vision and mission, as well as its policy priorities to the Vision2030. This Strategic Plan is therefore anchored on the first Medium Term Plan(2008-2012) of the Vision 2030 and will form the basis for the School‘s performance contracting over the plan period. The Plan will ensure that the School provides tangible contributions to the dynamism and transformation of the economy towards the envisaged globally competitive and prosperous nation. It will also provide strategic direction for the School with regard to resource targeting and programmes implementation in line with the Sessional Paper No. 1 of 2005 and KESSP. It will ensure that the above role of the School to Kenya‘s development agenda is effectively and efficiently planned and executed

 

The School is in a transition phase with a new management in place and has a great need to manage its growth & transition to another level. The key priority areas of the school will include; equipping laboratories, alternative lighting, renovating and building staff quarters, improving boarding facilities, enhancing textbook access and improving physical education facilities. Construction of the sanitarium, dormitory, remains a high priority for the school. The school leadership will pay specific attention to income generating enterprises mainly focusing on agriculture e.g. farming, poultry among others as integral component of supplementing school finance. Farming in all its forms from horticulture, bee keeping, fish farming, and poultry among other key areas will give the school the needed economic impetus. Education is the key to any sustainable development. Quality secondary education will be the school’s key priority.

Nyanchwa Boys High School’s 2015-2020 strategic plan is organized to foster the government’s policy on access to education for all that is based in one of the MDGs, providing relevant and quality secondary school education that enables the youth of Kenya to fit in their community and to enable them complete internationally. Nyanchwa Boys High school is committed to developing boys and girls to reach their potential by providing quality education and support the young people of this country intellectually, socially, spiritually and physically to global levels.

The strategic plan is based on principle and beliefs that influence the behavior and way of life of boys and girls attending Nyanchwa Boys High school. The principle and beliefs include integrity, teamwork, commitment, safe environment and religious virtues where all stakeholders are result oriented       

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CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

1.1       Historical profile of Nyanchwa Boys High School.

Nyanchwa Boys High School stands at the foot of Nyanchwa Hill and is about 1 km from Kisii Town along Gusii Stadium Road.  The school is in Kisii Central District, Nyaribari Chache Constituency, Kisii County. The history of Nyanchwa schools goes back to 1918 when the Seventh-day Adventist Missionaries started a primary school whose objective was to teach the young and adult converts to read and write.  The school was commonly known as “Rirondo” which means “make shift” building.  No certificate was offered for this course.  Pastor Paul Nyamweya was in charge assisted by Senior Chief Musa Nyandusi.

Formal education was begun in early 1930s which was supervised and managed by pastors from the Sevent-day Adventist church.  Pastor Stanly Nyacheo was the education director.  In 1948, Pastor Webster was in-charge and the school offered intermediate exams standard seven then was equivalent to the current form one and Competitive Entrance Exam (C.E.E) was offered.  At standard eight, the Kenya African Primary Examination (KAPE) was offered.

In 1965 the missionaries started a secondary school as a “Harambee school” with boarding facilities.  The school was located at the current Nyanchwa Adventist Secondary School.  In 1974, the school was taken over by the government and it moved to be located at the current site.  Table 1 shows the school heads since 1974.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.2 Previous school management.

The school has been provided leadership by the following tabulated individuals.

Name

From

To

Hezekiah Mobisa

1965

1972

Late Joel Amenya

1972

1983

Late Gideon Machoka

1983

1992

John Abai

1992

1995

Joel Onyancha

1995

2002

Late Bathsheba Nyambane

2002

2004

NaphtalNyangiti

2004

2007

Timothy Atuti

2007

2010 (time of split)

Source: School records

Form 1974 to 2010 the institution operated as a boarding mixed secondary school.  Due to challenges facing mixed secondary schools among them Boy-Girl relationships, the stakeholders recommended the separation of Boys and boys into two independent schools.  The separation was officially done in October 2010.

From a humble beginning in 1918 Nyanchwa Boys High School has seen tremendous increase in student and staff population.  Over time, this has outstripped the existing and new physical facilities that have been put up in due course.  The problem has further been compounded by the poor fees payment by parents and guardians that has eroded the school’s financial resource base.  This has caused unnecessary financial constraints in school expenditure coupled with poor performance for quite some time.

The school corporate culture has also been greatly affected.  Due to its urban setting there is a lot of complacency in poor performance and lack of morale from many students and staff.  Inadequate parental support in some cases as a result of has resulted into juvenile delinquency as some students have been involved in drug and substance abuse.  This has led into increased indiscipline cases.  

Apart from the infrastructure being inadequate for the school population, most physical facilities are dilapidated and therefore require urgent renovation. The aforesaid has made it difficult for the school to achieve its vision and mission and of providing quality education, spiritual and social values that equip young people to be competent and responsible citizens respectively.  In order to reverse this, it has become necessary to develop this strategic plan to provide a road map of the institutional management.

1.3       The Rationale of the Strategic Plan

The Nyanchwa Boys High School, Strategy has been developed, based on the rationale, that the School has made a milestone since inception 94 years ago. The School has a need to determine new levels of management performance.  Infrastructure facelift and expansion improving MSS, income generating activities especially in agriculture, are key basis for this current strategic plan. Redefinition of the School mission & vision has necessitated new strategic objectives to be pursued in the next five years. This strategic plan outlines specific strategies that will enable the School achieve its mission and vision. This provides a road map on how the School can develop policy documents such as finance policy, procurement policy, project management policy, and other relevant policy documents. The strategy ensures that Nyanchwa Boys High School is an enviable leader in education in Kisii county, and Kenya.

This school’s strategic plan was developed in tandem with Kenya’s vision 2030, the global Millennium development goals and Ministry of Education strategic plan. Following the successful implementation of the ERSWEC in Kenya, the Government through a consultative process has therefore developed the ―The Kenya Vision 2030 to guide the country‘s development in the long-term. The Vision will be implemented through three pillars namely economic, social and political. The economic pillar seeks to achieve an average economic growth rate of 10% per annum and sustaining the same till 2030 in order to generate resources for meeting MDGs and Vision goals. The social pillar aims to create a just, cohesive and equitable social development in a clean and secure environment. The political pillar seeks to realize an issue-based, people-centered, results-oriented and accountable democratic system. It is the intention of this strategic plan to produce students who will be fundamental in helping the county achieve vision 2030 targets and more specifically the three pillars mentioned above

1.4       Education reforms

 

Education is acknowledged as a means for transforming and empowering communities. The youth especially gain skills, knowledge and attitudes to enable them become productive members of the society. Education contributes to sustainable development, and is recognized in Kenya as a priority area of development intervention as is reflected in policy documents. The Government of Kenya has developed key policy documents over the last ten (10) years; Poverty Reduction Strategy Plan (PRSP) of September 2002 and its successor the Economic Recovery Strategy Programme (ERS) of 2003, and the Vision 2030 of 2008; they all emphasize the importance of education especially to be able harness the countries development agenda.

 

 

 

1.5       Mandate of Nyanchwa Boys High School

 

The school has outlined its mandate as provided for by the Education Act and Education sector reforms as follows:

  1.                     i.            Offer Education and skill development in the Country
  2.                   ii.            Prepare and guide students, for evaluation by appropriate examining bodies
  3.                 iii.            To promote science, technology and innovation in all training programmes

The specific mandate of the School as provided for by the Education Act, Education Strategy and Education reforms are;

Offering Education training, prepare and guide students for evaluation by appropriate examining bodies as well as promoting Research, Science, Technology and Innovation in all its learning programmes.

1.6       Core functions of Nyanchwa Boys High School

Our functions are largely derived from the MOE legislative mandate and Strategic Plan which has been developed from the Sessional Paper No 1 of 2005 and the KESSP document. Our core functions shall include:-

1.  Curriculum implementation.

2. Implementation of policy guidelines

3. Administration and management of schools education programmes.

4.  Providing curriculum support materials.

5.  Provide quality education and training.

6.  Administration of examinations and tests.

7.  Support teachers and support-staff management

8.  Promoting and motivating interest in science and technology

1.7       Non – Core/Support functions of Nyanchwa Boys High School

 

The school support functions include;

a)      Catering/Provision of lunch services

b)      Accommodation/hostels

c)      Transport services/School bus

d)     Security services

e)      Spiritual emphasis

f)       Guidance and counseling

1.8       Challenges of Nyanchwa Boys High School in implementing the strategic plan

 

The following key challenges may hinder the full realization of the School’s mandate if not addressed in this strategic plan.

  • Capacity to cope with global trends in technology
  • Inadequate equipment and Infrastructural facilities for Learning and Teaching.
  • Inadequate staff and skills capacity
  • Inadequate  and low technologically relevant training materials/equipments
  • Inadequate reference materials
  • HIV and AIDS and its impact on society

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER TWO: ENVIRONMENTAL SCANNING

2.1     Overview

The School has undertaken its current situational analysis through SWOT analysis so as to form the basis to developing the strategic objectives the School will pursue in the strategy period (2015 – 2020).Environmental scanning/situational analysis and management has to establish the specific opportunities, threats that face the school now that it situates at the heart of Kisii County Headquarters.  Internal school weaknesses, such as most of the roofs in dire need to be replaced have to be relooked into.The school strengths such as a conducive learning environment and adequate land that require planting of more trees and flowers in the school to give it the aesthetic value it deserves has to be addressed too.

2.2       SWOT Analysis

The table below shows the summary of the school’s strengths, Weaknesses, opportunities and threats.

Table 2.1 Summary of SWOT Analysis

Strengths

Weaknesses

  • Highly skilled and adequate personnel in the school
  • High student population
  • Availability of internet access
  • Adequate school land
  • Strategic  School location
  • Christian based  School values
  • Competent school management
  • Adequate Learning facilities
  • Good will
  • Wide curriculum
  • Electricity available in school
  • Available piped water
  • Security at the school
  • Conducive learning environment
  • Single (boys) school
  • Effective Heads of Departments ensuring efficiency in respective departments.
  • Excellent support from the School Administration and well established institutional structure. (BOG, PTA, Principal, deputy principal)
  • Sufficient classrooms, teaching and learning resources.
  • Slow integration of I.C.T, and limited subject choices.
  • Sustainable boarding programme for both staff and students

 

  • Low enrollment
  • Lack of ablution facility (poor state of ablution facilities)
  • Lack of dining hall
  • Lack of music and sporting facilities
  • Lack of sanatorium
  • Poor payment of school levies
  • Uncooperative students
  • Underutilization of resources
  • Poor time management
  • Poor Execution of decisions
  • Limited sources of school finances
  • Lack of professionalism
  • Inadequate coordination and communication between support and teaching staff
  • Indiscipline among some students
  • Inadequate boarding facilities
  • Low academic performance (low Mss)
  • Lack of staff residential houses
  • Lack of use of internet in school
  • The school is poorly established in terms of co-curriculum activities.
  • Poor exposure to vital learning facilities e.g. Library
  • Unreliable source of income from Income Generating Projects
  • Inadequate staff houses.
  • Poor fees payment by parents and guardians.
  • Lack of a staff code of ethics
  • Inadequate nurturing of student talent
  • Improper motivational mechanisms for staff and students

 

Opportunities

Threats

  • A wide catchment area for students
  • A large pool of alumina
  • Accessibility of the school
  • Free secondary education funds
  • Bursaries
  • Devolved governance in Kenya
  • The school’s unutilized land resource; this provides ample room for expansion of infrastructure.
  • High potential for more staff houses consequently more participation in provision of education services.
  • Subsidized education hence more students joining school.
  • Good will and potential support from Member of parliament, councilors and provincial administration
  • Principal’s training on organizational management
  • Transparent allocation and utilization of CDF and student bursaries that comes with the new constitution
  • Internet
  • Conducive environment for student learning

 

 

  • Competition by other schools
  • Corruption
  • Political influence
  • Technology becoming obsolete
  • Negative influence from the Kisii town and County headquarters (social evils associated with town life)
  • Poor previous KCSE performance  
  • Low enrolment  
  • High dropouts and transfers to neighboring schools school 
  • Inadequate parental support towards the development of the school.
  • Drugs and substance abuse.
  • Remittance of free education funds lacks expedition hence causing unnecessary financial constraints in school expenditure.
  • Adolescence
  • Empty promises from politicians in terms of infrastructural expansion
  • Free primary education

 

 

2.3       PESTEL Analysis

PESTEL is an acronym that is elaborated below; 

P          -           Political

E          -           Economist

S          -           Socio cultural

T          -           Technological

L          -           Legal

E          -           Environmental/ecological

It is an external environment analysis tool for identifying and assessing political economical social cultural legal and ecological /environmental facts that may provide opportunities and threats to the school. PESTLE trends can either help the school to move forward. Opportunities or hold it back threats.

The school will have to keenly watch, analyze and consider the following PESTLE factors.

a)      Political factors

  • Current and future political support.
  • Funding trends from the government e.g. grants for specific projects.
  • Trade union bodies actions such as KNUT, KUPPET, COTUamong others.
  • Effect of political/election violence/threats.
  • Teachers transfer initiated by politics.
  • Taxation policy e.g. increases VAT which increase prices of goods.
  • Impact of educational reforms.
  • The role of county governments in management of schools.
  • The uncertainty/unpredictable future CDF funding procedures.

 

 

 

b)     Economic factors

The following will provide threats or opportunities and ultimately affect the school.

  • Economic activities of parents.
  • Local, national and world prices of goods.
  • Lending rates by banks and the CBK’s actions on them.
  • Current and future spending of the government.
  • Budgetary allocation on the ministry of education.
  • Government economic policies such as taxation and its resultant effects.
  • Effects of drought, bad weather, unemployment in the local and national level. 
  • Fluctuations in exchange rates.
  • Overall economic situation.
  • Strength of consumer spending power or pouching ability of parents.

c)      Social factors

The school  will have to  prepare and  handle  social  issues affecting  the  students teachers and  staff arising from.

  • Broken families.
  • Abusive parents due to drug and alcohol abuse.
  • Single parenthood.
  • Early pregnancies.
  • Pre-marital sex.
  • Truancy.
  • Physically challenged student’s
  • Poverty and  parental neglect
  • Corruption and other related issues.
  • Attitude to the education of the girl /boy child.
  • Corporate responsibility.
  • Social mobility.
  • Religious intolerance among the various religious groups in the area.
  • Media views and perceptions of the local area and its effect on education.

 

d)     Technological factors

The school needs to embrace ICT, E-learning and digitalization of the curriculum. This will come with other related issues such as:

  • Security of the machines gadgets and information.
  • Obsolesce of the machines.
  • Compatibility of the computers
  • User requirements.
  • Data management and security.
  • Cost and maintenance.
  • User restrictions.
  • Patent rights.
  • Training needs and refresher courses.

e)       Legal factors

The school will take into account the following legal issues that touch on education.

  • Children Act.
  • Labour laws e.g. on discipline.
  • Basic Education Act 2013, Employment and dismal Act.
  • Teachers Service Commission Act 2012
  • Kenya National Examination Council  Act 2013
  • The new constitution  2010
  • Laws related to the health e.g.  Public health Act.
  • Legal authority regulations on land use.
  • DEB regulations and approval of collections and use of funds.

The school will have to align its actions and plans to the above laws and regulations where applicable.

f)       Environmental factors

Environmental factors that favor the adoption and application of Education include:

a)      Kenya recognizes the value of her environmental resources. It also recognizes that the degradation of the environment can adversely affect productivity and increase levels of poverty in the country. 

b)      The Environmental Management and Coordination Act (1999) provide that all in Kenya are entitled to a healthy environment that they are required to safeguard and enhance.

Environmental factors that limit the adoption and application in School include:

a)      A number of human related activities around the School have led to environmental harm. The rate of exploitation of the land and biological resources is considered unsustainable. Natural ecosystems, important for a number of natural services and products are being converted to other uses or face the threat of degradation due to pollution.

b)      Enhanced emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere has led to global warming and climatic change, and the changes to the earth surface through various human activities, including waste disposal, has contributed to global environmental change, the local magnitude and potential impact of which is yet to be established. To Nyanchwa Boys High School, these changes pose both potential risks and opportunities for food production, human health and energy availability, among many others.

c)      High Electricity tariffs are conduits for Kenyans to seek alternative energy supply thereby destroying the environment.

The following table shows the likely political, economic, socio – cultural, technological, environmental and legal factors’ possible impact on school operations and mitigation measures.

PESTEL FACTORS

LIKELY IMPACT

MITIGATION  MEASURES

Political

  • Influence on BOG selection
  • Influence of a ward of school tenders
  • Influence teacher transfers
  • Influence on admissions
  • Political balkanization of the school resulting in neglect in CDF allocation to schools
  • Low salaries for TSC teachers as their salary increment is a political process from the teachers union movement
  • School projects stagnation
  • Interference
  • False promises by politicians to develop the school
  • Adhere to Ministry of Education Policy Guidelines
  • School to adopt neutral position in local and national politics
  • Involve politicians in the development agenda of the school especially fundraising
  • Improve school relationships with politicians
 

Economic

  • Low income of parents of school
  • Poor payment of fees
  • Large number of orphans without sponsors
  • Low salaries to BOG teachers
  • Increasing prices of goods the school buys for its operations
  • High wage bill of the school
  • Inflation

 

  • Start school income generating activities such as Biogas, bakery, bee keeping, poultry, daily farming e.t.c.
  • Bursaries to needy students and orphans
  • Fundraisings
  • Establish sponsors and grants to supplement school budget
  • Buy school supplies in advance

Socio – cultural

  • Negative ethnicity
  • Community wants students admitted with low marks

 

  • Adopt a professional approach when putting in place new school management
  • Develop a framework to appreciate the diversity of the Kenyan communities
  • Develop language policy in the school
  • Guidance and counseling
  • Admit students with low marks into a “special stream” and indentify and nurture talent

 

Technological

  • Underutilization of I CT by teachers
  • Power blackouts
  • Mobile Phones has potential to be used in cheating during examinations
  • Regulate mobile usage while in school premises
  • Train teachers on ICT
  • Seminars for teachers (Capacity building)
  • Develop Power back up systems
  • Establish online system
 

Environmental

  • Drought resulting in water shortage in the school, dusty days
  • Rains impedes movement between classes hence disruption of teaching, muddy days
  • Extreme weather leads to infections hence need for medications in the school rises
  • Air and water pollution hence increased health cases
  • Build sheds along pavements
  • Make  up classes
  • Drill a borehole in the school
  • Control liquid and solid waste management professionally
  • Plant more trees
  • Purchase an incinerator

 

 

Legal

  • The constitution
  • Students attending court sessions as witnesses
  • Outlawed corporal punishment
  • Teachers and support staff attending court sessions
  • Likelihood of suppliers suing the school
  • Rights of children and that of the girl child
  • Abolition of holiday tuition
  • Sensitize teachers on provisions of the constitution
  • Remedial classes for student (S) attending court cases
  • Explore alternative punishments to students
  • Adhere to the procurement laws
  • Adhere to the bill of rights in the constitution
  • Give students adequate work
 

 

2.4 Stakeholder Analysis

The stakeholder analysis is crucial in determining all individuals, groups and organizations influenced or influencing Nyanchwa Boys High School directly or indirectly. This strategic plan recognizes and pays attention to all stakeholders’ interests, to their roles, responsibilities and influences that affect the school’s success and how the school is expected to respond to any challenges that may be posed by stakeholders. The school’s response is defined by the strategic actions for each year during the period 2015-2020.

2.4.2 TheNyanchwa Boys High school’s expectations of each of the Key stakeholders                                           

a)  The Students

  • Be present in the school and to attend all programs.
  • Develop independent learning and revision strategies.
  • Undertake all assignments, assessment tests and examinations.
  • Maintain healthy and interactive relations with the teachers.
  • Maintain the highest levels of discipline and commitment to learning.

b) The Parents

  • Make a sustained follow-up of the student’s academic performance to high grades.
  • Provide appropriate funding and support for schools programmes.
  • Provide   adequate  support to the student emotionally , physically and spiritually
  • Provide uniform and lunch funds
  • Provide basic learning facilities
  • Develop the school generally

  c) The Teachers.

  • Teaching the subject of specialization.
  • Ensure access of all available textbooks to students, maintain and update related records and timely retrieval.
  • Preparation and efficiently utilize schemes of work, records of work and records of tests and examinations.
  • Make a sustained follow-up of the students class work, academic performance, and maintenance of high grades.
  • Stimulate interest, work morale and enthusiasm of students in the learning process.
  • Work as a team.
  • Be exemplary to students and support staff in the execution of their duties

d)  The Board of Governors.

  • Ensure adequate resource support and its proper utilization.
  • Ensure availability of adequate human resource-teachers and support staff.
  • Ensure highest levels of discipline are maintained by students and staff.
  • Make a continuous assessment or follow-up on academic performance and implementation of academic programs.
  • Ensure continued motivation of students, staff and parents.

 

The following table summarizes stakeholder analysis.

Stakeholder

Expectation

Influence

Importance of school success

Desired response from stakeholders

Type of participation required.

Students

Attain desired grades for greater development.

Siblings’ parents; teachers, peers.

Very high

Discipline and co-operation

Active participation in all planned programs

Teaching staff

Learning/teaching resources are in place

TSC, MoE, parents; peers.

Very high

Corporate/teamwork and leadership in role playing.

Participation/involves in planning committee review curriculum implants

Support staff

Make working environment safe with adequate provisions to execute tasks.

Family, PTA, HoDs,

BOG

High

Teamwork and good governance, involvement in committee to plan/review and support activities.

Participate/involves in planning committee, review curriculum, and general implementation.

parents

Achievement of high grades and security for students

Teachers, peers students, PTA and KNEC

Very high

Prompt payment of school levies and social support

Active involvement in planning monitoring and evaluation of activities

 

B.O.G

A performing and well governed school with adequate facilities

Students, parents, teachers, knec,

MOE.

very high

Good governance and leadership provision

Involvement in planning, monitoring and evaluation of activities.

Ministry of education{MOE}

A well governed and performing school

Government policies

High

Provide policy guidelines and monitor standards

Regular visits to the school to give advice and monitor progress

County  Education Board[CEB]

A well governed and performing school 

Approval and endorsement of school plans

High

Expects feedback from the school plans and reports

School provides information and MOE verify

Teachers service commit ion

Teachers provide services accordingly

Teachers, BOG,MOE

Very high

Expects monthly returns and reports from school

Staffing the school according to the curriculum based establishment [CBE]

National exams council

A well organized examination centre

Students, teachers,

MOE

Very high

Maintain required standards of discipline, avoid  irregularity

Provide security and  monitor discipline during exams marking and give results

Tertiary institutions 

Students who meet career equipments

Job market, join other institutions

High

Provide information and motivate students

Provide information, careers and job market

Local community

Provide human and  resources  for pay

Students,

Teachers,

MoE

 

High

Provide advice and material support

Provide human and material resources to the school

 

2.4.2 Summary of Stakeholder Analysis

The following table shows the likely expectations from the stakeholders of the school, what they want from the school and mitigation measures.

STAKEHOLDER

WHAT THEY WANT

MITIGATION

Politicians

  • Recognition
  • Involvement
  • Recognize them
  • Involve them in school programmes especially fundraising for school projects
 

Alumni

  • Recognition
  • Involvement
  • Recognize them
  • Involve them in school programmes especially fundraising for school projects
 

Government departments

  • Cooperation e.g. police department, Ministry of Education e.t.c
  • Information
  • Cooperate with them
  • Provide them with relevant information
 

Students

  • Good results
  • Respect and dignity
  • Involvement in issues affecting them
  • Create girl child friendly learning environment
  • Respect them and foster a self – respect concept of the girls
  • Involve them especially through coaching and guidance and counseling sessions
 

Parents/Guardians

  • Good results
  • Information on the progress of their children
  • Respect and courtesy
  • Teaching of the students
  • Train support staff in public relations when handling parents and school visitors
 

Suppliers

  • Opportunity to supply the school
  • Fairness in awarding school tenders
  • Prompt payment
  • Be an equal opportunity provider to all suppliers
  • Pay suppliers promptly
 

General public

  • Good image of the school
  • Continuance of the school to the foreseeable future
  • Improve the school public image
  • Prudent management of the school affairs
 

Teachers

  • Better working environment
  • Motivation
  • Better salaries and allowances
  • Teaching  tools and materials
  • Provide teachers with adequate teaching tools and materials
  • Motivate teachers
  • Allow them time in the activities of their union for bargaining for better salaries
 

Support staff of the school

  • Continuation of the school
  • Better working conditions
  • Better salaries and allowances
  • Prudent management of the school
  • Improve the working conditions of the support staff and improve their terms of engagement
 

NGOs and CBOs

  • Recognition
  • Information
  • Involvement
  • Recognize their existence
  • Provide them with school progress reports and involve them in the school activities and the overall school development agenda.
 

School surrounding community

  • Corporate social Responsibility programmes that directly benefits them
  • Employment opportunities
  • Opportunity to supply the school
  • Develop CSR programmes that benefits the local community where the school situates
  • Employ community members into support staff cadre
  • The school to be an equal opportunity provider for tendering of school suppliers
 

 

 

 

 

2.5 Institutional Capacity

Nyanchwa Boys High School has a board of governors BOG and a parent’s teachers association PTA in line with the education act.The principal, who is the chief executive officer CEO and secretary of both BOG and PTA, is in charge of the day-to-day running of the school. He is assisted by Deputy Principal, senior teacher, Dean of studies DOS, Heads of department HODS, Assistant teachers and the auxiliary staff to run the school.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER THREE: STRATEGIC DIRECTION

3.1 Mandate Vision, Mission and Core Values

Mandate

The schools’ mandate is to carry out the government of Kenya’s’ Policy on access to education for all(EFA) as provided for in the Ministry of Education, Vision 2030, and other global blue prints such as sustainable development goals previously known as MDGs though providing the relevant and quality education that enables the Kenyan youth to fit in his/her community and to enable him/her compete globally.

Proposed School motto:

Passion for Excellence

Vision:

A model institution for moulding respectable loyal and honesty citizens

Mission:

To provide holistic education services that develops talent and instills a desire to make a positive difference in the family, community, and the world

Core values:

  1. Teamwork
  2. Responsibility
  3. service to God
  4. Integrity
  5. Community work

 

 

3.2Strategic Issues

Following the SWOT, PESTEL (the situation) Analysis for NyanchwaBoys High School  as well as lessons learnt from the performance Preparation; the School’s mandate, core functions, the MoE’s strategic plan, the National Education Strategy, the ST&I Policy and Strategy, the ST&I and Education 2008-2012 MTPs, the following seven issues emerged as strategic issues;-

Staff: Nyanchwa BoysHigh School is an institution which has a small number of teaching and support staff which is inadequate to meet the demands. In addition, most of the staff lacks the necessary skills and competencies in computer required for effective service delivery.The introduction of new and higher level courses therefore calls for staff upgrading to cope with the challenges.

Physical Infrastructure:Nyanchwa BoysHigh School is an institution with inadequate infrastructure. The growing Institution call for development of advanced training programme that promotes a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship. This cannot be realized because the following infrastructure is lacking and the school has to put up the following: Renovate 2 and construct 4 staff houses, renovate 1 and construct 1 library, purchase 20 computers, Construct Ablution Block,Complete the school multipurpose hall, construct a Dormitory, construct a Sanitarium, Construct pavements and purchase furniture.

Equipment: The Institutionhas inadequate equipments. It also lacks fully-equipped offices. It therefore requires more computers, office furniture and cabinets

ICT Integration: In order to realize its mandate and deliver a technology-driven learning, research and wholistic education, the School needs to keep with technological advancement by integrating the use of ICT in its learning programmes.

Resource Mobilization: The resources required by Nyanchwa Boys High School to implement the strategies outlined include financial, human and physical resources. The costs are Inherent in the activities as outlined in the strategy; this step requires financial resources beyond the current annual budgetary allocation for Nyanchwa Boys High School and resources from the students in form of fees collection. Therefore the School may not be able to generate enough resources to implement this strategic plan totally by itself.

It is anticipated that the Government funding will not be adequate to ensure implementation of all the activities proposed in this strategic plan. To ensure realization of this plan in totality, it calls for seeking for alternative sources of funding.

3.3 Key result areas to be pursued in the strategy period

 

Following the Strategic Issues presented above, the following were identified as the strategic objectives and strategies of how to actualize the objectives and the activities under which the implementation programmes will be organized:

a)   Staff:

  • To increase the number of Teaching and Non-Teaching staff
  • To upgrade the skills of Teaching and Non-Teaching staff

b)      Physical Infrastructure:

To provide enough the physical infrastructure in the school

c)    Equipments:

To provide adequate learning equipment

d)      ICT Integration:

To ensure the school uses electricity and integrate ICT in management and learning

e)    Resource Mobilization:

To establish adequate source of funding for the Schools’ projects

     g)  Academic Performance

To ensure the school performs well and achieves a better mean score in KCSE of 8 plus in the school Mss

3.4 Strategies and Activities

  • Staff:
  • To increase the number of Teaching and Non-Teaching staff        
  • Increase the number of Teaching staff
  • Write letters to TSC for posting of Teachers in areas of shortage
  • Make visits to TSC to request for more teachers
  • Seek approval of BOG to employ Board Teachers in the short run
  • Increase the number of Non-Teaching staff
  • Recruit BOG staff
  • To upgrade the skills of Teaching Staff and Non-Teaching Staff
  • Train the Teaching staff
  • Mount short courses for the teaching staff
  • Mount short courses for non-teaching staff
  • Recommend Teachers for training courses run by various Government agencies
  • Physical Infrastructure:
  • To provide the physical infrastructure in the School
  • Increase the Teaching Infrastructure
  • Install electricity
  • Purchase a projector
  • Painting and repainting the school buildings
  • Develop a school website
  • Purchase a photocopy machine and two printers
  • Equipment:
  • To provide and upgrade the training equipment
  • To increase the learning equipment
  • Procure the training equipment
  • Procure enough reference materials
  • ICT Integration:
  • To integrate ICT in management and training
  • To integrate ICT in curriculum delivery
  • Procure computers, LCDs
  • Procure the training software
  • Train staff
  • Academic Performance
  • To ensure the school performs well and achieves a better Mean Score in KCSE of 8 Plus
  • Set challenging targets for each year
  • Monitor teaching and examination administration
  • Resource Mobilization
  • To establish adequate source of funding for the Institution’s projects       
  • Establish Public-Private Partnerships
  • Identify the relevant industries in the private sector
  • Negotiate partnership agreements with the identified industries
  • To lobby the Government for more funding
  • Write funding proposals and budgets to the government for more funding
  • Write funding proposals to other bodies for funding

 

 

 

CHAPTER FOUR: STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES/KEY RESULT AREAS

4.1       Overview

Based on the SWOT, PESTEL and STAKEHOLDER analyses, the School has selected the following strategic objectives to be pursued in the next five (2015 – 2020) years.

4.2       Estimated Costs for implementing the Strategic Objectives of the 2013 – 2017 Strategic plan

No.

Strategic Objectives/KRAs

Estimated Costs (Kshs. Millions)

1

Upgrade and build new school infrastructure, (renovate two and construct 4 staff houses, 

07

2

Improve the school M.S.S to 8 plus

5

3

Motivate teaching staff

3

4

Construct one dormitory (storey building)

15

5

Enhance the production of various agricultural products as school income generating activities

0.5

6

Construct a sanitarium

06

7

Complete the multipurpose hall

05

8

Construct pavements

02

9

Upgrade ICT systems in the school

16

10

Develop student talent especially in co – curricular activities

1

11

Purchase a projector

0.1

12

Equip science laboratories

3

13

Renovate all roofs of school buildings

12

14

Enhance boarding facilities

4

15

Improve student textbook ratio to 1:1

3

16

Enhance physical education facilities

2.5

17

Recruit non teaching staff

0.3

18

construct one library and renovate one library

05

19

Develop school website

0.005

20

Purchase a photocopy machine and two printers

0.1

Total

78.050

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMPLEMENTATION LOGICAL MATRIX 2013 - 2017: STRATEGIC RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS OF KSHS.80 MILLION

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 1:   UPGRADE AND BUILD NEW SCHOOL INFRASTRUCTURE (KSHS.40 M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

Sourcing for funds to be used in upgrading and constructing new school infrastructure such as teachers houses (one storey building), boarding facilities, 3 classrooms,

(50%)

. Budgeting

. Fundraising

. Seeking strategic partners

-Upgrading said infrastructural facilities

- Building new infrastructure

. Level of funds raised and put aside

. Number of infrastructural facilities upgraded and built

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Number of funding partners established

Principal

 

 

 

 

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

2.

Smart sourcing of the architects and construction contractor (10%)

. Sourcing for architectural designs

. Tendering of contractors

. Identified architect and Construction Contractor

 

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Principal

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

3.

Smart sourcing of the building materials (30%)

. Sourcing of building materials

. Inventory of building materials procured

 

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Principal

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

4.

Use of locally available materials and labour (10%)

. Assessing availability of local materials and labour

. Use of local materials &labour

.level of local materials &labour used

 

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Principal

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO 2: IMPROVE ON ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE THROUGH INCREASING THE SCHOOL M.S.S TO 8 PLUS(KSHS.5 M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

Motivate teaching staff through cash and other a wards to best subject mean scores

(50%)

Number of motivation cash and other a wards given to teachers

.Level of teacher motivation

 

  • N
  • o

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Dean of studies, all teachers

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

 15%

 10%

2.

Motivate students through performance incentives and rewards (10%)

Number of students given performance incentives

.Level of student motivation

 

  • N
  • o

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Dean of studies, all teachers

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

 15%

 10%

3.

Introduce internal academic excellence competition, remedial teaching, and frequent evaluations (30%)

Number academic excellence competitions done

.Number of academic competitions

 

  • N
  • o

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Dean of studies, all teachers

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

 15%

 10%

4.

Improve access to teachers for one on one coaching (10%)

Number of coaching sessions undertaken

.level of student coaching in the school

 

  • N
  • o

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Dean of studies, all teachers

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

 15%

 10%

 

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 3:PURCHASE 20 COMPUTERS (KSHS. 6 M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Identify suppliers of computerscompany

(0.05%)

Purchase the computers

(99.05%)

 

. Identify supplier of computers

. Purchase of the computers

.

. Computers purchased

. Amount of money spent in purchasing computers

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Level of funding and budgetary allocations to purchase of furniture

Principal, Chairman BOG.

 

 

 

 

0%

100%

0%

0%

0%

                     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 5:PURCHASE FURNITURE (KSHS. 1.5M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Identify suppliers of furniture

(0.05%)

Purchase the school furniture

(99.05%)

 

. Identify supplier of furniture

. Purchase of the school furniture

 

. Number of furniture purchased

. Amount of money spent in purchasing furniture

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Level of funding and budgetary allocations to purchase of furniture

Principal, school tendering committee.

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

                     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 6.INVEST IN POWER BACK UP SYSTEM (KSHS. 1.5M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Identify suppliers of power back up systems

(0.05%)

Purchase the school power back up systems

(99.05%)

 

. Identify supplier of power back up systems

. Purchase of the school power back up systems

 

. A power back up system purchased

. Amount of money spent in purchasing a power back up system

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Level of funding and budgetary allocations to maintenance

Principal, school tendering committee.

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

                     

 

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 7.EQUIP CHEMISTRY, PHYSICS AND BIOLOGY LABS (KSHS.3.M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Identify suppliers of lab equipments and chemicals

(0.05%)

Purchase the school lab equipment and chemicals

(99.05%)

 

. Identify supplier of lab equipment and chemicals

. Purchase of the school lab equipment and chemicals

 

. Number of Lab equipment and chemicals purchased

. Amount of money spent in purchasing lab equipment and chemicals

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Level of funding and budgetary allocations sciences equipment

Principal, school tendering committee.

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

                     

 

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 8.PURCHASE TEXTBOOKS (KSHS.3.M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Identify suppliers of text books

(0.05%)

Purchase the school text books

(99.05%)

 

. Identify supplier of text books

. Purchase of the school text books

 

. Number of text books purchased

. Amount of money spent in purchasing textbooks

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Level of funding and budgetary allocations to purchase of textbooks

Principal, school tendering committee.

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

                     

 

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 9.PURCHASE PHYSICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES (KSHS.2.5M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Identify suppliers of physical education facilities

(0.05%)

Purchase the school physical education facilities (99.05%)

 

. Identify supplier of text books

. Purchase of the school text books

 

. Number  physical education facilities purchased

. Amount of money spent in purchasing  physical education facilities

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Level of funding and budgetary allocations to purchase of physical facilities

Principal, school tendering committee.

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

                     

 

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 10.EMPLOY  TEACHING AND NON TEACHING STAFF (KSHS.1.M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Identify suitable teaching and non teaching staff eligible for employment

(0.05%)

Employ the teaching and non teaching staff (99.05%)

 

. Identify suitable and qualified teaching staff

. Identify suitable non teaching staff

-          Employ teaching staff

-          Employ non teaching staff

 

. Number  of teaching staff recruited

. Number of non teaching staff employed

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Level of funding and budgetary allocations to capacity building

Principal, school tendering committee.

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

                     

 

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 11.MOTIVATE TEACHING AND NON TEACHING STAFF (KSHS.3.M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Identify suitable and affordable  resorts where teachers can be taken for teambuilding exercises

(0.05%)

Take teachers out for team building exercises

(Mombasa, Tanzania) (99.05%)

 

. Identify suitable team building sites

. Take teaching staff out for team building cum adventures tours

-          Train support staff as a motivation exercise

. Number  of team building trips teaching staff taken

. Number trainings conducted for support staff

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Level of funding and budgetary allocations to team building and motivation

Principal, school tendering committee.

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

                     

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 12.INVEST IN SCHOOL INCOME GENERATING ACTIVITIES (KSHS.0.5.M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Identify suitable and viable school income generating activities

(0.05%)

 

 

Invest in school income generating activities (99.05%)

 

. Identify suitable and viable income generating activities

. Undertake initial investment in school income generating activities

 

. Number  of school income generating activities indentified

. Number income generating activities allocated funds for investment

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Level of funding and budgetary allocations to administration

Principal, school tendering committee.

 

 

 

 

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

                     

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 13: CONSTRUCT A DORMITORYAND UPGRADE OTHER DORMITORIES (KSHS.10 M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

Sourcing for funds to be used in upgrading and constructing new school infrastructure such as teachers houses (one storey building), boarding facilities, 3 classrooms,

(50%)

. Budgeting

. Fundraising

. Seeking strategic partners

-Upgrading said infrastructural facilities

- Building new infrastructure

. Level of funds raised and put aside

. Number of infrastructural facilities upgraded and built

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Number of funding partners established

Principal

 

 

 

 

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

2.

Smart sourcing of the architects and construction contractor (10%)

. Sourcing for architectural designs

. Tendering of contractors

. Identified architect and Construction Contractor

 

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Principal

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

3.

Smart sourcing of the building materials (30%)

. Sourcing of building materials

. Inventory of building materials procured

 

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Principal

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

4.

Use of locally available materials and labour (10%)

. Assessing availability of local materials and labour

. Use of local materials &labour

.level of local materials &labour used

 

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Principal

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

 

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE NO. 14: CONSTRUCT A SANITARIUM AND UPGRADE EXISTING (KSHS.15M)

Strategies

 

Activities

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Means of verification

 

Responsibility centre

Budgetary Allocations (Est.) in Million (% ge of total cost Kshs.)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019/0

1.

Sourcing for funds to be used in upgrading and constructing new school infrastructure such as teachers houses (one storey building), boarding facilities, 3 classrooms,

(50%)

. Budgeting

. Fundraising

. Seeking strategic partners

-Upgrading said infrastructural facilities

- Building new infrastructure

. Level of funds raised and put aside

. Number of infrastructural facilities upgraded and built

 

.  School records

.  Kisii County  Education records

.  Number of funding partners established

Principal

 

 

 

 

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

2.

Smart sourcing of the architects and construction contractor (10%)

. Sourcing for architectural designs

. Tendering of contractors

. Identified architect and Construction Contractor

 

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Principal

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

3.

Smart sourcing of the building materials (30%)

. Sourcing of building materials

. Inventory of building materials procured

 

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Principal

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

4.

Use of locally available materials and labour (10%)

. Assessing availability of local materials and labour

. Use of local materials &labour

.level of local materials &labour used

 

.School records

. Kisii County Education records

Principal

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

 

 

PROPOSED MONITORING AND EVALUATION INSTRUMENT

 

STRATEGIC PLAN QUARTERLY PERFORMANCE REPORT

Performance Target

Units

Target for Quarter

Quarter

Cumulative to Date

Actual Achievement

Target for Quarter

Variance

(B – C)

Actual Achievement

Target

Variance

(E – F_

 

 

A

B

C

D

E

F

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Comments on any variance (un) favorable, causes and action taken

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CHAPTER FIVE: MONITORING AND EVALAUATION

 

5.1 Introduction

Monitoring the implementation of this strategic plan will involve routine data collection and analysis on the success of the implementation of the plan. The results from the analysis will then be used to inform decision making at all levels. The objectives of the strategic plan will be reinforced through corrective measures when and if necessary. This will be achieved by:

  1. Developing of monitoring and evaluation indicators at all levels of implementation
  2. Carrying out continuous data collection, analysis and monthly reporting to the School’s Senior Management
  3. Carrying out random inspections and making objective observations
  4. Conducting specially designed surveys and rapid assessments to assess progress
  5. Linking the Schools M&E framework to the MoE’s M&E system
  6. Carrying out participatory Monitoring and Evaluation (Stakeholders Fora)
  7. Facilitating independent assessment and reviews of the programmes under implementation in all the departments in the School

The implementing units will submit periodic review reports to the School’s Senior Management. These reports will be reviewed regularly against the indicators to ensure that there is positive progress.

5.2 Evaluation Mechanism

The strategic plan will be evaluated during and after implementation to ensure that it produces the intended results. The plan will inherently be subjected to independent evaluation to remove any element of bias. The evaluation will be carried out using relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, sustainability and impact measures.

A logical framework will be designed for each strategic objective showing the expected outputs, activities, Monitoring and Evaluation tasks, means of verification, the action centres, time frame and resource requirements in the implementation of the plan.

5.3. Plan Monitoring and Evaluation Framework

The Monitoring and Evaluation function will be spread across all the Departments and therefore, each will create a framework with similar features of the Logical Framework for the Strategic Plan, within which to collect, analyze data, prepare and disseminate reports.

The M&E plan outlines the outputs and key activities to be undertaken under each of the strategies. The logical frame work extends this information by specifying indicators of the achievements of the various outcomes and the activities, the means of verifying the various outcomes and activities, the means of verifying the achievements and a time table for doing so, and the facilitating and constraining factors expected to affect achievement. 

Alternative M&E methodologies including; regular reviews, spot inspections and observations as well as special and rapid assessment surveys will also be adopted. It is also suggested that the management of the M&E programmes be done through the establishment of the school’s Performance Contract Committee (PCC).

 

 

CHAPTER SIX: FINANCING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF STRATEGIC PLAN

6.0. Introduction

Good strategic plans are never implemented because of various reasons. It is important to note that the major obstacle to effective strategy implementation is inadequate financing of the strategic objectives. The current 2015 – 2020 strategic plan of Nyanchwa Boys High School has an estimated expenditure of Kshs. 78 million. The school total income from schools fees collection, ministry grants and income generating activities are all consumed in recurrent expenditure. Therefore only 25% of it is available for school developmental expenditure hence this strategic plan has a deficit financing of 75% of total required funds to implements this current 2015 – 2020 strategic plan

 

Given the resource constraints, the Institution will vigorously pursue additional funding and technical support from Government funding and development partners. At the Institution level, activity-based costing method will be adopted both as a tool for activity planning and financial control. This will serve the role of ensuring that the Institution allocates costs of inputs based on each planned and prioritized activity. This means that the costs of activities will be traced to the product or service for which the school’s activities over the planned period are performed.

The approach will be relevant to performance budgeting in that it will lead to much improved program costing, hence provide a systematic way of determining how to apply the limited resources to the right activities to produce the right results and as a means of developing a tighter relationship between the planned outputs and funding.

In this regard, the Institution will lobby and mobilize financial resources from the following sources;

6.1 Cost Optimization

To further enhance service delivery through effective financial management the school will concentrate efforts on the following optimization of resource use and identification of cost saving measures to eliminate wastages; planning and budget executions through quarterly regular expenditure reviews of the school’s Expenditure Framework (SEF); and prompt preparation and implementation of annual work plans.

6.2 Government Funding

With regard to Government funding, the school will prepare, present and justify proposals as a basis for resource bidding within the Government’s budgetary processes. In this regard, the Institution will coordinate with the MoE to ensure that the respective annual Sector Reports accommodate the needs of this plan.

6.3 Constituency Development Fund (CDF)

With regard to CDF, the School will prepare, present and justify proposals on development projects within the plan. The proposals with be sent NyaribariChache CDF Committee through relevant authorities for considerations.

6.4 Governor’s office education Committee

With regard to Governor’s office, the School will prepare, present and justify proposals on development projects within the plan. The proposals with be sent to the ECM Education /Governor’s office Education Committee through relevant authorities for considerations. 

6.5 National ST&I Fund

The School through the Ministry of Education (MoE) will seek for funding from the Kenya National ST&I Fund on initiatives in the School that are ST&I based. This will be in line with the objective of the foundation which is to secure adequate local and international funding in support of national ST&I competitiveness in Kenya.  

6.6 Venture Capital

The private sector will be targeted to provide capital to bridge the gaps in the financing the programmes outlined in this plan. The programme will focus on Public-Private Partnership (PPP) funding.

6.7 Donors (Development Partners)

The School currently has a better working relationship with development partners across the globe and will continuously seek collaborations with like-minded institutions all over the world. The School as part of its national and international linkages will engage the support of development partners to fill in the resource gap between the resources allocated by the government through recurrent and development allocations as well as grants.

6.8 Risk and Mitigation factors

It is assumed that during the period of the implementation of this strategic plan, a reasonably stable and conducive political environment will exist. It is also assumed that development partners will continue to offer supplementary funding as well as technical assistance as has been anticipated in the Strategic Plan. In addition, it is hoped that there will be no significant calamities such as civil unrests, droughts, floods, epidemics that will constrain the implementation of the plan. The School is however, determined to stay focused and deter any unforeseen obstacles through its committed staff and the Support of the Government through MoE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER SEVEN: STRATEGIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION

7.1 The Implementation Approach

The strategic model and the coordination framework form the basis upon which the Logical Framework is developed. The implementation of the plan will, however, employ the approaches described below;-

7.2 Phasing and Sequencing

This strategic plan will be implemented in phases. Due to the large number of activities, both human resources and funding may not be available to facilitate implementation of all activities at the same time. As a result, it will only be possible to implement the strategic activities in phases between 2015 and 2020 financial years.

7.3 Quick Wins

To ensure that momentum is maintained, the plan will also focus on programmes/activities with quick wins. The quick win approach is prudent for the implementation of the plan as it produces rapid results which motivate people and keep them enthusiastic to support the rest of the activities.

7.4 Plan Performance Management

The implementation of the plan will also embrace performance management concept which entails the setting up of standards and targets, measuring actual performance against set targets, and reporting on the results. This approach aligns this plan with the Public Sector Reforms and the Kenya Vision 2030 that requires that the public sector improves its provision of services to attain competitiveness.  

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER EIGHT: RISK OF IMPLEMENTING THE STRATEGIC PLAN

8.1 Introduction

It is assumed that during the period of the implementation of this strategic plan, a reasonably stable and conducive political environment will exist. It is also assumed that development partners will continue to offer supplementary funding as well as technical assistance as has been anticipated in the Strategic Plan. In addition, it is hoped that there will be no significant calamities such as civil unrests, droughts, floods, epidemics that will constrain the implementation of the plan. The School is however, determined to stay focused and deter any unforeseen obstacles through its committed staff and the Support of the Government through MoE. The following is a summary of risk analysis in the context of implementing the Nyanchwa Boys 2015 – 2020 Strategic Plan.

 

Type of risk

Inherent risk

Likelihood

Impact

Mitigation

Timeframe

Responsibility center

Compliance Risks

Regulatory

HIGH

HIGH

-Comply with government laid policies through MOE guidelines and TSC Act.

continuous

Principal

Liquidity Risks

Loss of public trust

LOW

HIGH

-        Being able to meet school’s short term financial obligations

continuous

Principal

 

Lack of income

LOW

MEDIUM

-        Convertible school assets to generate income e.g trees, land e.t.c

continuous

Principal

Credit Risks

 

Loss of School  funds through embezzlement

LOW

HIGH

-        Regular review and standardization of schooldebtors and creditors

continuous

Principal

-        Education and training of customers and staff.

Principal

 

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